Tag Archives: M.A. Tateishi

Artsy on Escape Into Life: Carlito Dalceggio

28 Aug

As much travelling as Mr. Forager and I do, we have yet to venture outside the US.  But we have big plans to do so and I can. not. wait.!!  Recently Artsy Forager fave artist, M.A. Tateishi, journeyed to a dream destination of mine, Turkey ( read all about it on her blog here ).  While she was there, M.A. experienced the most amazing looking installation, Revolution Revelation, created by artists Arkin (Mercan Dede) and Carlito Dalceggio.  I was especially struck by the style of Dalceggio– so modern Byzantine meets urban graffiti!  So I’m featuring his work on my Artist Watch over on Escape Into Life today.  His works feel like an escape into the intricacies of Moorish architecture in a delightfully twisted way.  Nothing but love from this Artsy.

Portrait of Jean Michel Basquiat ( RWD ) by Carlito Dalceggio

Carlito Dalceggio on Escape Into Life

Artist Takeover, Day 2: M.A. Tateishi

31 Jul The Walls of This Old House, mixed media with resin, 36x48

Welcome to Day 2 of our Artists Takeover Event!  Today’s artist is the only Canuck in the bunch this week, Vancouver artist M.A. Tateishi.  M.A. is an artist whose work I immediately connected with and the artist herself has become a great supporter and friend.  Our conversation gives you a little behind-the-scenes peek at Artsy Forager!

The Walls of This Old House, mixed media with resin, 36×48

M.A. Tateishi | You feature a lot of inspiring and different artists. How do you find the artists, and is there a particular reaction you have to art when you find it…like an immediate fall-in-love feeling, or does some work grow on you? Do you have to sort through a lot of “bad art” to find the good ones?

Artsy Forager | I find the artists I feature through a number of different avenues– some I’ve known through working in the industry, others I’ve found through galleries ( both visited in person & online ), social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, through other artists, through other art blogs, lifestyle blogs, even some DIY, fashion & home decor blogs will occasionally feature interesting artwork.  Really just keeping my eyes open at all times.  I try to always have a pen & paper handy, as you never know when you may happen upon something amazing!  The reaction is a little like falling in love or at the very least having a crush!  My heart will skip a beat and many times my mouth will drop open. 😉  I’ve been told I have a “great eye” and my husband used to always ask how I knew really great work from mediocre– it’s hard to describe, it’s more of an artistic intuition, I guess.  It’s funny, but many of the sources through which I find work are so full of great stuff that I don’t really have to sift through much “bad art”.  I do get emails from artists whose work doesn’t quite make the cut for Artsy Forager, though.  I always want to be encouraging to anyone who is willing to reach out and ask to be featured, but I strive very hard to keep the standard of work featured high. If I do need to “reject” an artist, I try to offer other avenues for online exposure.

Pixelated Rhythm, mixed media with resin, 36×48

MAT | How do you organize your writing? Do you have a lot of posts ready to go, or do you work on deadlines? Do you have an editor/friend to bounce things off, or do you work alone?  And how to you manage all your social media? Are you typing away on your iPhone while you’re waiting at the post office?

AF | I plan out Artsy Forager posts usually no more than a week or two ahead.  I’m a bit of a procrastinator by nature, something I’m trying to work on, so right now, that’s about as far out as I can plan & organize for the posts themselves.  Since I post to the blog Monday-Friday and my husband’s schedule can change, I’m sometimes writing & scheduling posts in advance for the days when he is off.  For instance, he’s currently working Wed-Sun, so I make sure to have all my posts completed and scheduled for Monday & Tuesday by Sunday night, so that we can enjoy time together without too much distraction.   I normally work alone, but will sometimes bounce ideas off fellow bloggers, artists and of course, my hubby is always a ready ear.  I’m still learning to smartly manage social media.. I finally signed up for Hoot Suite, which allows me to advance schedule posts to social media and has gone a long way toward helping me maintain an online presence even when I may not be physically near a computer. 😉  You may be surprised to learn that I don’t have an iPhone or even internet access on my cell phone and right now the hubby and I share one MacBook Pro between us.  It can make keeping up more difficult, but it also helps to be able to disconnect when spending time with my hubby.

Neon City, mixed media with resin, 36×48

MAT | Finally, what motivates you to do the Artsy Forager? As an artist I can see the benefits for me, and I think it’s important to bring original art to as many people as possible, but I was wondering what inspires you?

AF | This is a really interesting question and one I’m sure many artists are curious about.  I began Artsy Forager when I left a long time gallery/ art consultation position and was preparing to leave Florida to begin traveling the Northwest with George.  I knew that I would be bored without something to occupy my time while George was working and getting a different job in a new town every 3 months didn’t seem appealing or even possible.  I thought about what I’d loved the most about my former position, what really excited and motivated me– it was the artists themselves and their work. I’ve always loved writing, I was almost a Lit major before switching to Art History and I thought blogging would be an interesting way to fuel my passion for art, help artists succeed in whatever way I could and allow me to build and create something of my own.  What really inspires me is the relationships I’m building with artists from all over the country.  When artists come to me for advice, I am honored, humbled and inspired to do more of whatever I can to help them succeed.  Who knows where Artsy Forager may lead in the next few years.  I hope it leads to greater success, not just for me, but for every artist featured.

Champagne Pop, mixed media with resin, 24×36

To see more of M.A.’s work, please visit her website.  Taking over tomorrow:  Christina Baker!

All images are via the artist’s website.

Artsy on Escape Into Life: M.A. Tateishi

14 Feb

There are certain artists whose work resonates with me, to whom I return again and again for inspiration.  Vancouver, BC artist M.A. Tateishi is definitely an artist whose work fits into that category!  I’m so happy to feature her over at Escape Into Life today.  Please click on over and take a look at this extraordinary artist’s work!

Bridesmaids, mixed media with resin, 36x48

M.A. Tateishi on Escape Into Life

Excavations of Paint, Process and a Little Bit of Pink

15 Nov thrush-song

Many artists will paint multiple paintings on the same canvas, one on top of the other.  But while most are painting over work that they’ve tired of or that was unsatisfactory, Vancouver artist M.A. Tateishi, layers her paintings in order to later reveal what is hidden underneath.

Pink Is The Navy Blue Of India, mixed media and resin on board, 36×48

In her Excavations series, she layers 10 to 20 underpaintings onto her panel, then begins her process of excavation to reveal the varied surfaces underneath.  A final coat of resin seals the surface and enhances the visual depth of each work.

Neon City, mixed media with resin, 36×48

To me, there is something really beautiful and moving about work that utilizes this process of selective revelation.  After the artist has created a visual history, to then go back and unearth those hidden gems must be a bit like the excitement of opening gifts on Christmas mornings.  Oh, what treasures may be found!  What happy surprises lurk just beneath the surface!

Spiral Joy, mixed media on panel, 36×36

M.A.’s Transparency Series offers an even more fluid experience of each work’s visual history, as each layer is transparent and clearly visible in the finished work, as well as the underlayer of the wood panel, adding a wonderful organic texture against the pops of bright color.

Fire Snake, mixed media on panel, 40×40

Free Bird, mixed media and resin on board, 36×48

M.A. once told me that she often feels like a piece isn’t complete without a little touch of pink.  This is an artist that definitely embraces the power of pink and isn’t afraid to unearth what is hidden.

To see more of M.A.’s revealing work, check out her website and Facebook page.  If you happen to be in the Vancouver, BC area, MA Tateishi will be participating in the Eastside Culture Crawl this weekend.  See her website for more details!

Featured image is Thrush Song, mixed media on panel, 36×36.  All images are via that artist’s website.

Friday Faves: Think Pink

21 Oct 36119_130161760348373_130161590348390_200869_5232181_n

In honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, this Friday Faves round up is dedicated to the color pink.  Pink is the color of femininity, yes, but it is also becoming a symbol of positivity and the power to overcome.  This month and always, Artsy Forager encourages you to Think Pink– breast cancer is a threat to us all, but what an encouragement it is to see so many women ( and men ) winning their battle!  I hope you’ll consider making a donation or linking to The Pink Fund on your blog of Facebook page, look for the link at the bottom of the post.

Rabbit Girl by Denise Nestor, acrylic on canvas, 20×30

Lilly by Michelle Armas, acrylic on canvas, 18×18

Monet’s Dahlia, acrylic on canvas, 36×30

Torn Dress by M.A. Tateishi, mixed media and resin on board, 36×48

Mariposa by Sarah Ashley Longshore

To see more of today’s featured artists’ work, please visit their websites:

1.  Denise Nestor

2.  Michelle Armas

3.  Lisa Ernst

4.  M.A. Tateishi

5.  Sarah Ashley Longacre 

Don’t forget to check out The Pink Fund, a non-profit whose mission is to provide short-term financial aid to women and men who are in active treatment for and recovery from breast cancer.  Getting well shouldn’t mean financial ruin.

%d bloggers like this: