Tag Archives: Sarah Ashley Longshore

Friday Finds: Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Art

17 Aug

Ya’ll, I am a long time fan of The King.  Not a crazy-I-have-an-Elvis-room-in-my-house-and-make-a-yearly-pilgrimage-to-Graceland fan, but I will sing along with him every time he comes up on the iPod.  Yesterday marked the 35th anniversary of Elvis’s death and I’ve been seeing a lot of artists drawing inspiration from Mr. Presley lately, so thought I’d round up a few of my faves for you!

Sticker Elvis by Jim Blanchard

( Elvis ) Beyond the Bend by Deborah Scott

The Dr. Martin Luther King of Rock & Roll by Troy Gua

Thank You, Thank You Very Much by Sarah Ashley Longshore

Jim BlanchardDeborah Scott | Troy Gua Sarah Ashley Longshore 

Be sure and check out all these artists’ websites, linked above.  If you happen to be in the Seattle area, don’t miss Elvistravaganza!a curated show featuring works inspired by The King during Bumbershoot, Sept 1st-3rd.  All the cool kids will be showing, including Deborah Scott, Jim Blanchard and more!

All images are via the artists’ websites, linked above.

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Artsy Spot: Gallery Orange

22 Feb

In the heart of the New Orleans French Quarter, housed in a 200+ year old classic Creole building lives Gallery Orange, a contemporary fine art gallery whose vibe and vision match the freshness of its signature color.

Gallery Orange, New Orleans, exterior

If you’re a regular Artsy Forager reader, you’ve heard of Gallery Orange before.  I first found GO when I discovered the work of Sarah Ashley Longshore, which then led me to Gallery Orange, her exclusive representation in New Orleans.  I found gallery owner Tracy Geilbert’s aesthetic and taste to be quite similar to my own and have been happily watching her list of artists grow and work by those artists flying off the walls!  Tracy’s love of art and enthusiasm for original work is infectious, I’ve never seen a gallery promote their artists harder than she does!

Gallery Orange, New Orleans, interior with works by Sarah Ashley Longshore

Owner Tracy Geilbert was already selling art at a young age, making sketches of Duran Duran, photocopying them and selling the “prints” to her classmates. ( Ah, a fellow 80’s girl! )  Part Dutch and part British, Geilbert studied  art and eventually graduated from the Royal Academy of the Arts at The Hague.  Life would eventually take her to post-Katrina New Orleans and, after working for another high-end New Orleans gallery, heeded the call of her heart to open a space of her own.

Gallery Orange, interior, works by Guus Kemp

Gallery Orange, New Orleans, interior, works by Gigi Mills, Carlos Lopez and Jill Ricci

Starting in a tiny 600 square foot space, with only two artists on her roster, Tracy’s hard work and eye for unique talent led to the gallery’s current space on Royal Street where boutique galleries are springing up and blazing new trails on the New Orleans art scene.  Tracy brings her Dutch artistic sensibilities to the gallery, offering only exceptional original work ( no giclees here! ), creative energy galore and a bit of good humor thrown in.  Gallery Orange is all about serious art that doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Gallery Orange, New Orleans, exterior

If you are in New Orleans or planning a visit, do not miss a trip to Gallery Orange!  Delightful, deliciousness awaits you!  You can see a list of upcoming shows at GO on their website— which is newly redesigned, make sure you check it out!

All images are courtesy of Gallery Orange.

C’est La Vie de la Nouvelle-Orléans

21 Feb

New Orleans is one of those places that is unlike any other.  It is unique in it’s history, traditions and way of life.  Artists of all kinds, writers, musicians, painters, are attracted to its vibrancy and joie de vivre.  In this most European of American cities, the arts are not just a weekend hobby of the 1%.  Creativity is an ingrained part of daily life.  Each day is touched by artists in some way.  And today, as the town celebrates the most New Orleansish day of Mardi Gras, I thought we’d explore NOLA through the eyes of its artists.

As I was thinking about what makes New Orleans such an extraordinary place, six characteristics kept coming to mind..

SUSTENANCE

No doubt New Orleans is famous for its cuisine.. a bit French, a bit Southern.. totally deliciously unique.  Jambalaya, po’ boys, beignets, shrimp creole..  I would be perfectly happy to eat my way through the city!  Artist Carlos Lopez celebrates the simplicity and purity of New Orleans cuisine in his still lifes of oysters found in the city’s gulf waters.

Southern Trio With Lemon, oil on canvas, 36x24 ( via Gallery Orange )

SWINGIN’

New Orleans Jazz is the soundtrack for the Delta.  The horns, the banjo, the bass.. you can’t help but tap your feet.  NOLA artists George Schmidt and Frank Kelley, jr., capture the energy that flows from the melodious sounds of Dixieland jazz.  Though currently living in Florida, artist Yvonne Lozano’s Delta roots still show through.

NOLA by Yvonne Lozano, mixed media on canvas, 24x36

Buddy Bolden's Nervous Breakdown from A History of New Orleans Jazz series by George Schmidt, oil on canvas

A Jazz Extravaganza by Frank Kelley, jr., limited edition lithography, 18x15

STRUCTURE

The city’s architecture reflects the diversity of its history and inhabitants.. from grand antebellum mansions to the European-influenced ironwork of the French Quarter to humble shotgun houses, each illustrates a facet of the city’s rich culture and history.  And, of course, each has been a source of inspiration for artists such as Grant Schexnider, whose Shotgun Series celebrates the spiritual wealth found in these humble abodes.

Skinny Shotgun 1 by Grant Schexnider, oil on canvas, 18x36

STYLE

New Orleanians have a style all their own.  Unfailingly friendly and hospitable, but direct and unafraid to tell it like it is.  But always with charm and high style.  The stylishly cheeky work of NOLA artist Sarah Ashley Longshore fits the city like beads on Mardi Gras.

Audrey in Orange by Sarah Ashley Longshore, acrylic on canvas with high gloss resing, 30x30 ( via Gallery Orange )

SPIRIT

Joyful.  Exuberant.  Even in the face of darkness and destruction, every day in New Orleans is a celebration of life.  Ally Burguieres’ work shines brightly with the fire of the people of New Orleans.

Moonrise on Bourbon by Ally Burguieres, oil and acrylic on wood, 36x18

STRENGTH

The final and most enduring characteristic of New Orleans is the strength of its community and culture.  Poverty, disease, disaster, destruction.  The city has seen it all, yet through each trial, comes out on the other end that much stronger.  Cory Willingham’s work explores the inner strength found when a community is called upon to rebuild.

Almost Home ( diptych ) by Cory Willingham, acrylic and wallpaper on canvas, 24x30 each

New Orleans isn’t just party central at Mardi Gras.  It is a community filled with artists who are serious about preserving the city’s history and not just persevering, but thriving into the city’s future.  It is a city that loves its artists and they return that devotion a hundredfold.  We’ll continue the NOLA love tomorrow, when Artsy Forager features a NOLA gallery bringing a fresh and contemporary, yet uniquely New Orleans style to the French Quarter!

All images are via the artist’s websites linked above, unless otherwise indicated.  Images by Carlos Lopez and Sarah Ashley Longshore are via Gallery Orange.

Friday Faves: Masters Remade

17 Feb

If you’ve ever taken an art class, I’m sure you’ve copied the work of a “master”.  Redrawing and painting great works of art is one of the tried and true methods used to teach basic skills.  I love the way some artists are taking masterworks and recreating them in fun and interesting ways.  Check ’em out!

Out of the Square by Cesar Santos ( via artrenewal.org )

Frida Dog by Clair Hartmann

Man Ray by Jocelyn Grivaud

Girl With a Pearl Earring by Sarah Ashley Longshore ( via Gallery Orange )

Have a fantastic weekend, Artsies!  Any plans for museum visits this weekend?

Cesar Santos ( His official website seems to be down. You can see some examples of his work at Art Renewal Center. )

Clair Hartmann 

Jocelyn Grivaud 

Sarah Ashley Longshore 

Featured image is Picnic in Central Park by Cesar Santos ( via Art Renewal Center ).  All images are via the artist’s websites, unless otherwise stated.

Artsy on Escape Into Life: Sarah Ashley Longshore

7 Feb

Happy Tuesday, Artsies!  Make sure to head over to Escape Into Life to check out today’s feature on Artsy Forager fave Sarah Ashley Longshore.  One of her pieces would make any place more chic and fun, no?

Octopus Audrey, acrylic on canvas with high gloss resin, 24x24

Sarah Ashley Longshore on Escape Into Life

Friday Faves: It’s Like High School Without the Bad Hair

6 Jan

‘Tis a new year and with that comes all sorts of lists documenting the good, the bad and the ugly from the past 12 months.  While there’s certainly no bad or ugly here at Artsy Forager, I thought it would be a kick to award our featured art some high schoolish superlatives.  Put your mittens on your kittens and away we go!

BEST DRESSED:  Kelly Reemsten

Holding Your Attention by Kelly Reemsten, oil on panel, 36x36 ( via Skidmore Contemporary )

CUTEST COUPLE:  Maggie Taylor

Ever After by Maggie Taylor, pigmented digital print, 15x15

BEST HAIR:  Robin Williams

Tired Prince by Robin Williams

MOST THOUGHTFUL:  Susan Hall

Peace by Susan Hall, oil on panel, 27x27

LIFE OF THE PARTY:  Sarah Ashley Longshore

Last Call by Sarah Ashley Longshore, acrylic on canvas with high gloss resin 48x60 ( via Gallery Orange )

MOST ATHLETIC: Eric Zener

Love by Eric Zener, oil on canvas, 14x11

BIGGEST FLIRT:  Deborah Scott

The Girl Would Believe Anything by Deborah Scott, oil and mixed media on canvas

BEST SMILE:  Ann Marshall

Ba. by Ann Marshall, graphite on paper, 20x14

MOST LIKELY TO TAKE OVER THE WORLD:  Steve Williams

Taxicab Situation with Counterfeit Results, mixed media, 48x48

Were you awarded a superlative in high school?  Let me guess, Most Creative? 🙂  Have a great weekend, Artsies!

Featured image is Books by Holly Farrell, acrylic and oil on masonite.  All images are via the artist’s websites, unless otherwise stated.

Friday Faves: Think Pink

21 Oct

In honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, this Friday Faves round up is dedicated to the color pink.  Pink is the color of femininity, yes, but it is also becoming a symbol of positivity and the power to overcome.  This month and always, Artsy Forager encourages you to Think Pink– breast cancer is a threat to us all, but what an encouragement it is to see so many women ( and men ) winning their battle!  I hope you’ll consider making a donation or linking to The Pink Fund on your blog of Facebook page, look for the link at the bottom of the post.

Rabbit Girl by Denise Nestor, acrylic on canvas, 20×30

Lilly by Michelle Armas, acrylic on canvas, 18×18

Monet’s Dahlia, acrylic on canvas, 36×30

Torn Dress by M.A. Tateishi, mixed media and resin on board, 36×48

Mariposa by Sarah Ashley Longshore

To see more of today’s featured artists’ work, please visit their websites:

1.  Denise Nestor

2.  Michelle Armas

3.  Lisa Ernst

4.  M.A. Tateishi

5.  Sarah Ashley Longacre 

Don’t forget to check out The Pink Fund, a non-profit whose mission is to provide short-term financial aid to women and men who are in active treatment for and recovery from breast cancer.  Getting well shouldn’t mean financial ruin.

[ Insert Art Here ]

27 Sep

Artwork has the power to facilitate change.  Most importantly, in our minds, spirits and hearts.  But today, we’re going stay in the more shallow end of the pool.  🙂  Let’s have some art + design fun and  take a look at a beautifully designed room and see how just changing up the artwork can transform the way the room feels.

For our first go ’round, we’ll start with a fairly classic, neutral room:

Look #1:  In keeping with the classic, slightly beachy style of the room, we’ll add an oceanscape by Tennessee artist Christina Baker.

The shift from mirror to artwork, in this case, is subtle, but what an impact!  Makes for a much more interesting room, yes?  Even the pup seems more pleased!

Look #2:  Though the space is gorgeous, it could use a well-placed pop of color!  So let’s see what a Michelle Armas abstract does for it..

The lovely colors and lively brushstrokes really bring the space into a shinier, happier territory, don’t they?

Look #3:  The best way to help elevate a traditional room into something with a bit more personality?  A graphic and quirky piece by Sarah Ashley Longshore from her Audrey Hepburn series.

This look works because what’s more classic than Audrey Hepburn?  That’s right, nothing.  So her iconic image keeps with the traditional vibe, but the bright colors and pop-style of the painting add a punch of the unexpected.

Hope you enjoyed our little peek at how varying styles of art can change a room’s personality!  What’s your home’s art-style?  Do you change things up or keep your favorites up ’round the clock?

Be on the lookout for future installments of this new Artsy Forager feature, [ Insert Art Here ]!

Featured room image via House of Turquoise, architect James Cullion and interior designer Eileen Marcuvitz, photographed by Robert Benson.

Fashion Forward Art

12 Sep

Kicking off artsyF A S H I O NWeek here at Artsy Forager!  Fashion and art have long been intertwined.  For centuries, artists have, perhaps at times unwittingly, been the recorders of the history of fashion and style.  It is in thanks to artwork that we can track what was worn by whom hundreds of years ago.  Paintings weren’t just art, but were the fashion magazines and blogs of their day.  For instance, thanks to Vermeer, we see a glimpse of the difference in the daily costume of the classes in a Mistress and Maid.

Mistress and Maid by Johannes Vermeer, c. 1666-1667

Today’s artists seem to have a bit more freedom to interpret instead of record.  Fashion is such an integral part of our modern culture, it is no surprise that it still holds a fascination for contemporary artists.  For some artists, the fashions themselves are worthy focal points.  Denver artist Roxanne Rossi elevates a simple dress’s silhouette into an artistic statement, a sculptural fashion plate, clean but heavy in texture, it seems like it could come to life at any moment.

Afternoon Delight by Roxanne Rossi, acrylic, 36x60

Sometimes the fashion media becomes a literal component to a piece of fashion-influenced art, such as in the collage work of Melbourne, Florida artist Derek Gores.  His imagery has the composition of a Vogue magazine spread and the collaged photos, magazine, labels, etc give each piece a painterly depth.

All Summer Long by Derek Gores, mixed media collage

Painter Kelly Reemtsen uses the constraints of mid-century era mindsets about fashion and juxtaposes them with garden tools and hardware, producing visual statements about the expectations placed on women, by themselves and the world at large.

Throwback by Kelly Reemtsen, oil on panel, 36x36

Celebrating the female form, both physically and spiritually, Leigh Pennebaker’s wire sculptures reveal designs that are sensuous and soft, despite their industrial materials.

Madeline by Leigh Pennebaker, wire sculpture

Like many fashion-forward artists, Megan Cosby began with an interest in fashion design, but decided she was more interested in the people themselves and what their style said about their personality, who they are, where they’ve been and where they are going.

Better by Megan Cosby, mixed media on canvas, 14x12

And then there’s the smart and cheeky work of Sarah Ashley Longshore, at once playing homage and poking fun to our culture’s obsession with fashion.  I’ve featured her Audrey Hepburn paintings several times on the blog, but she also has this fabulous series focused on fashion and pop culture.

Trophy Wife Junk Drawer by Sarah Ashley Longshore, acrylic and high gloss reisn on canvas, 48x72

More fashiony-artsy goodness to come this week!  Stay tuned.

Featured image is Major Poontang by Sarah Ashley Longshore.

Cure For The Mean Reds: Sarah Ashley Longshore

16 Aug

Today, I have a case of the mean reds.  If you know what that means, you’re awesome.  If you don’t know what that means, you need to watch Breakfast at Tiffany’s asap.  Holly Golightly’s cure for the mean reds is to get in a cab and go to Tiffany’s.  Well, there is nothing even closely resembling a Tiffany’s here in Aberdeen.  It wouldn’t be my happy place anyway.  Anthropologie would be more like it, but there’s nothing like one of those here either.  So today, I’m trying to cure the mean reds by enjoying some artwork featuring Miss Golightly herself, the fabulous Audrey Hepburn.  Yes, I know I’ve already done a feature on Sarah Ashley Longshore’s Audreys. But she’s been busy painting some new ones, so I think they deserve a second look.  And a third and fourth look.  Really, as long as she’s painting them, they’ll be showing up here.

Now that is all the chatting I feel up to today.  Enjoy Sarah’s Hepburns.  Don’t be surprised if you’re suddenly seized by the urge to put on a little black dress and pearls.

Mariposa, acrylic on canvas with high-gloss resin, 60x72

Audrey With Peacock, acrylic on canvas with high-gloss resin, 48x72

Audrey Underwater With Goldfish, acrylic on canvas with high-gloss resin, 24x24

Audrey Rojo, acrylic on canvas with high-gloss resin, 24x24

You can see more of Sarah Ashley Longshore’s work on her website or by visiting the Gallery Orange website, her representation in New Orleans.

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