Tag Archives: architecture

Home is Where..: Paul Davies

26 Jul

This traveling thing can be tough in many ways, but perhaps the most wearying is always living in someone else’s home.  As hard as I work to make each place feel like ours, we always end up feeling a bit like house crashers.  But then again, in some cases, we find ourselves caring for an otherwise empty, lonely house.  Like the dwellings in Australian artist Paul Davies’ work, we are sometimes greeted by a sad shell.  It is only when a house is occupied and filled with love that it truly becomes a home.

Seidler House, Sunset, acrylic on canvas, 122x153cm

Modern Home, Empty Pool, acrylic on canvas, 153×122 cm

Many of the houses Paul chooses to paint seem devoid of life.  There are furnishings, but no people to be seen, pools with no water in which to swim.

Night Pool Copy, acrylic on canvas, 76x76cm

Like Davies’ abodes, a few of the homes we’ve occupied were crying out to be cared for.  The one we rented in Coeur d’Alene was a particularly sweet little cottage that seemed so neglected due to its rental status.  Any improvements were done on the cheap.  What a lovely home it could have made for the right family, if only it were given the chance!

Seidler, Tree & Pool, acrylic on canvas, 122x153cm

Peach Sky + Modern Home + Pool, acrylic on canvas, 122x153cm

Does anyone else see an empty house and think of how much happier it would be if it were cared for and loved as a home?  Just me?  What does your own home say about you?

To see more of Paul Davies’ work, please visit his website.

Featured image is Empty Pool + Modern Home + Palms, acrylic on canvas, 122×122 cm.  All images are via the artist’s website.

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Towing the Color Line: Matthias Heiderich

2 Apr

Recently I’ve been hesitating to feature certain artists’ work because though I’ve had them in my queue for quite sometime, I suddenly starting seeing their work popping up all over other blog sites.  And the last thing I want to do is seem like a copycat.   But then I said to myself, Artsy Forager, why should you let that stop you from featuring talent that inspires you?  I answered, I shouldn’t.  Simple as that.  Case in point, Berlin photographer Matthias Heiderich.

Spektrum Eins series

Heiderich has over ten series of images showcased on his website and any one of them are beautiful enough to be featured.  But I’m currently in love with his most recent series, Spektrum Eins, so this post is full of his signature architectural loveliness.

Spektrum Eins Series

He is a master at finding the most interesting buildings and composing their intersecting angles and colors into striking, graphic compositions.

Spektrum Eins Series

His compositions are so simple yet so crisp, his colors so bright and bold.  The architectural forms take a backseat to line, color and shape.  Each photo is a celebration of simplicity.

Spektrum Eins Series

Spektrum Eins Series

To see more of Matthias Heiderich’s work please visit his website ( and I highly recommend you do! ).

All images are via the artist’s website.

Artsy Design: People In Stained Glass Houses

29 Mar

Does this sculpture by New York artist Tom Fruin remind you of anyone?

Kolonihavehus by Tom Fruin ( via Design Boom )

I’ll give you a hint.. 

Jackson Series 7 by Karen Schnepf

Do you see it?  Love how these very different works compliment each other!  Read more about Karen Schepf’s work here and Tom Fruin’s workhereand on Design Boom.

Featured images is Light & Shadow Play, Kolonihavehus, photographed by Nuno Neto.  Images are via the artists’ websites unless otherwise noted.


Friday Faves: City Slickers

15 Jul

We are headed to Seattle this weekend, one of my favorite cities in the world, the city where George and I fell in love.  And while I was falling in love with G ( I was probably a little in love with him when we were friends in FL, but that’s a story for another time ), I was also falling in love with Seattle.  I adore visiting cool cities– the urban landscape and architecture fascinates me.  So it carries over that I would adore the art of the cityscape.

For this Friday Fave round-up, I’d like to share some of urbanist artists whose work I’m crushing on lately:

Hill Houses 2 by Brin Levinson

Passing 1 by Jason Webb

Solitary I by John Duckworth

Loew's Hotel, 33rd Floor, Philadelphia by Sara Yeoman

Miyami by Darra Crosby

Great Tortoise Hostel, Seattle by Robin Weiss

Boulevard Windows by Sharon Dowell

Looking forward to bringing you more from these artists soon!  In the meantime,  take a gander at their websites..

1.  Brin Levinson

2.  Jason Webb

3.  John Duckworth

4. Sarah Yeoman

5. Darra Crosby

6. Robin Weiss

7. Sharon Dowell 

Are you taking it to the city streets this weekend?  What’s your favorite city for artsy inspiration?

Hands-On vs Hands-Off Artistry

27 Apr

In my daily reading of Artinfo.com this morning I came across two articles, seemingly unrelated, until the Facebook comments regarding one of the articles tied them together for me.  The first article, found here, poses the question, “Should Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia Remain Unfinished?”  The Barcelona basilica, begun in 1882 by renown artist-architect Antonio Gaudi is still under construction eighty-five years following the architect’s death. 

Sagrada Familia under construction in Barcelona, Spain

 Though Gaudi left plaster models and drawings, many of his notes were destroyed during the Spanish Civil War, leaving his vision open to interpretation by current sculptors, architects and designers.  While some critics feel the current direction doesn’t jive with Gaudi’s original vision, even during his lifetime, there were many sculptors working on the basilica.  Like any monumental undertaking, “it takes a village” to bring Gaudi’s creation to life.

Close-up of one of La Sagrada Familia's spires. Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Should Gaudi’s original design be so open to interpretation?  He gave artistic license to those working under him while alive, would he so object to modern interpretations now being imposed?  Unlike other types of sculpture, cathedrals are often the product of centuries worth of work by multiple architects, artists and craftsman. 

The star-studded ceiling of the east wing of La Sagrada Familia under construction. Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

As Gaudi was aware he would not be alive to see it to completion, wouldn’t he have known his original design would be open to interpretation by those who came after him?  Does the fact that Gaudi is not here to personally oversee the work negate the additions?

Artists using apprentices and assistants is nothing new.  The art world of the Renaissance era, which produced such celebrated masters as Michelangelo and DaVinci was built upon the concept of apprenticeship.  But what about now?  The second article I read this morning was regarding the approval of a Dale Chihuly museum at the site of a former amusement park in downtown Seattle ( now the Seattle Center ).

The museum in itself is the subject of controversy, but that isn’t what I’d like to address here.  Instead, I’d like direct attention to another Chihuly controversy– his use of others to craft his designs.  One Facebook poster thought it necessary to point out that since losing the use of his left eye due to a car accident, he is no longer the person actually blowing the art glass he is so famous for.  ( In reality, Chihuly continued to blow glass for three years following the accident, until a body surfing incident dislocated his shoulder, so he was no longer able to manually manipulate the glass ).   The poster’s statement that “His employees make everything.  Just sayin’.” seems to somehow fault Chihuly for continuing to create in the only way he physically could, by having others help him.  The artist himself has said that his role, more of a director, allows him better perspective on the work.

As stated above regarding Gaudi, the practice of using assistants and apprentices to create monumental works of art has been done for centuries ( and yes, many of Chihuly’s creations are monumental in scope ).  So as long as the artist himself continues to design the creations with his name on them, what’s the big deal?

And what about so-called “production originals”?  You might be thinking of the ones advertised as “hand painted original works of art”, usually being sold out of a hotel ballroom.  But what I’m talking about are the production art studios– where perhaps one “lead artist” is creating original works of art, which are then being recreated & reproduced by the hand of “assistant artists”.  There are more of these studios around than people realize and the work can be found in galleries, corporate and private collections all over the world.  While the savvy gallerist, art consultant, designer and art afficionado knows production art when they see it, what about the collector who thinks they are buying a true original work of art, only to spot an almost exact replica when in their hotel while on vacation in Hawaii?  Do we lump Chihuly in with these?

These are three examples of artwork being completed and accomplished without the direct hand of the creator.  What are your thoughts?  Is it ever OK to put your name on something you didn’t actually physically create?  This is definitely a gray area.. would love to hear your thoughts!

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